Opening Times & Ticket Prices
2016 Season: 17 April - 6 October.
Open Sundays to Thursdays
(Closed on Fridays and Saturdays during the Season, except for Special Events)
The Gardens
10am - 5pm
The House
Open 12 noon - 4pm
The House will close promptly at 4pm
House & Gardens:
Adult £12.80
Child (aged 5-16) £5.00
Family £31.00 (2 Adults + 3 Children)
Gardens Only:
Adult £9.50
Child (aged 5-16) £4.00
Family £23.00 (2 Adults + 3 Children)
Free admission to the Gift Shop and Bellingham Buttery.
Drawing Room

The Drawing Room leads off the Great Hall and is placed in what was originally the oldest part of the house. The room is dominated by portraits of Colonel James Grahme and his wife Dorothy, by Sir Peter Lely, as well as the vivid red silk damask that adorns the William and Mary period walnut furniture.

A fine Melchior D’Hondecoeter farmyard scene sits above a harpsichord by Schudi of 1773. The gilded candelabra are by Thomas Chippendale. Gerrit Jenssen made Colonel Grahme’s travelling writing desk and the restored marquetry commode is from the Louis XIV period. Gillows of Lancaster made the desk in the centre of the room for the Howard family in 1750.

The furniture in the room includes pieces by Thomas Pistor and several chairs in walnut and canework by William III’s cabinetmaker Daniel Marot. Of particular note are the set of four William and Mary walnut torchères, the Charles II walnut side table with the double spiral turned legs and the water gilt mirror. The George III japanned bracket clock by Robert Ward, c.1765 is similar to those made for the eastern market.

Passing through the door into the Small Drawing Room you will find a remarkable overmantle carved with the Bellingham arms and lively figures.

The inscription states:

'Thus the five sences stand Portraited here, the elements Foure and the Seasons of the Yeare, Samson supports the one side as in Rage, the other Hercules in Like Equipage'.

The room showcases many objects of interest left by previous owners of Levens, including the seal of Colonel James Grahme.

Did you know?
The topiary at Levens Hall is recognised by the Guinness Book of Records as being the oldest in the world.